Who am I?

My name is Jörgen Hartogs. I have been living and working in Ireland since 2003 and have provided guided walking tours in Dublin, including the Wicklow Mountains, Belfast and Cork.
I currently provide walking tours in Cork and the South Cork region, but I’m also available to tour operators and tour companies to provide guided tours.

I have also completed a diploma at University College Cork in Local and Regional Studies. You’ll find more on that course here: https://irishhistoryfiles.wordpress.com/ucc-dlrs
.

As a native Dutch, Flemish and German speaker I also have fluent, near native, level English and a working knowledge of Irish, Afrikaans, Latin, Swedish and Norwegian.
I provide translations to and from German, Dutch, English and Flemish, but I have also translated documents from Swedish, Norwegian, Latin, Afrikaans and Irish into English, though I do not offer translations the other way round as I believe in quality above everything else and I would not rate my proficiency levels in those languages sufficient yet. Hopefully I will be able to improve this in the coming years.

Diploma Local History and regional studies Qualifications:

Diploma, NFQ Level: Level 6

This course develops skills for those interested in local and regional studies, integrating approaches used by archaeologists, folklorists, geographers and historians. It is a study of the information that can be gleaned from documents, maps, museum collections and field-monuments. A wide range of teaching methods are used including weekly lectures, workshops, tutorials and field trips and students are encouraged to learn and research independently and to develop critical and analytical skills, which will support students when producing an original dissertation in year two. Students will employ diverse research methods and methodologies and engage with primary and secondary sources. At the end of the course students will have learned to differentiate between the research methodologies employed by a range of disciplines that work under the unifying theme: the significance of locality and region as a basis for study.

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