1848 – A gunfight takes place between Young Ireland Rebels and police at Widow McCormack’s house in Ballingarry, Co Tipperary

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The Young Irelander Rebellion was a failed Irish nationalist uprising led by the Young Ireland movement, part of the wider Revolutions of 1848 that affected most of Europe. It took place on 29 July 1848 in the village of Ballingarry, South Tipperary. After being chased by a force of Young Irelanders and their supporters, an Irish Constabulary unit raided a house and took those inside as hostages. A several-hour gunfight followed, but the rebels fled after a large group of police reinforcements arrived.

It is sometimes called the Famine Rebellion (since it took place during the Great Irish Hunger) or the Battle of Ballingarry.

As with the earlier United Irishmen, who sought to emulate the French Revolution, the Young Irelanders were inspired by Republicanism on the continent. 1848 was a year of revolutions throughout continental Europe.

Ireland was also still reeling from the impact of the Great Hunger. The British…

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Today in Irish History – 29 June:

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

In the Liturgical calendar, today is the Feast Day of Saint Peter and Paul.

1315 – Edward de Bruce inaugurated as High King of Ireland.

1771 – Birth of Edward Newell, United Irishman and informer, in Downpatrick, Co Down.

1820 – The Dublin Society becomes the Royal Dublin Society.

1820 – Robert Jocelyn, 2nd Earl Roden, former MP for Dundalk and a leader of the Orange Order, is alleged to have led an attack on Catholic homes in Dundalk. He is struck off the Commission of the Peace and ordered to be brought to trial, but flees to Edinburgh, where he dies suddenly on this date.

1848 – Paul Boyton was born in Rathangan, Co Kildare. Best known as the Fearless Frogman, he was a showman and adventurer some credit as having spurred worldwide interest in water sports as a hobby, particularly open-water swimming, water stunts that captivated the world…

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Today in Irish History – 29 June:

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

In the Liturgical calendar, today is the Feast Day of Saint Peter and Paul.

1315 – Edward de Bruce inaugurated as High King of Ireland.

1771 – Birth of Edward Newell, United Irishman and informer, in Downpatrick, Co Down.

1820 – The Dublin Society becomes the Royal Dublin Society.

1820 – Robert Jocelyn, 2nd Earl Roden, former MP for Dundalk and a leader of the Orange Order, is alleged to have led an attack on Catholic homes in Dundalk. He is struck off the Commission of the Peace and ordered to be brought to trial, but flees to Edinburgh, where he dies suddenly on this date.

1848 – Paul Boyton was born in Rathangan, Co Kildare. Best known as the Fearless Frogman, he was a showman and adventurer some credit as having spurred worldwide interest in water sports as a hobby, particularly open-water swimming, water stunts that captivated the world…

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1922 – The Provisional Government of the Irish Free State bombards the Four Courts in Dublin, and the Civil War begins.

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

On 14 April 1922 a column of 200 men led by Rory O’Connor occupied the Four Courts, hoping to provoke an armed confrontation with British forces which were in the process of evacuating from Ireland following the signing of the Anglo-Irish Treaty the previous winter which had split the IRA into two opposing factions. The occupation was a direct challenge to the legitimacy of the Provisional government who sought a smooth transition to a viable independent Irish state in the 26 counties of southern Ireland.

On 22 June Field Marshall Sir Henry Wilson was gunned down by two IRA assassins and on 26 June, the Free State Army Deputy Chief of Staff General J.J. O’Connell was kidnapped by the Four Courts IRA garrison. Collins had also shipped guns issued by the British to arm the new Irish Army to Northern IRA units to defend themselves from loyalists.

Michael Collins, no…

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Today in Irish History – 28 June:

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

1798 – United Irishmen Rebellion: General Hunter, who replaced Lake as Commander in Wexford, becomes aware rebellion is not over and begins to re-deploy his troops. He orders General Duff to Bunclody and General Needham to Gorey.

1798 – United Irishmen Rebellion: Death of John Henry Colclough. He was arrested with Lord Edward Fitzgerald on 27 May 1798 and taken to Wexford gaol. From there he was sent with Fitzgerald to parley with the rebels at Vinegar Hill, returning alone to report negotiations had failed. He was later, somewhat reluctantly, in the company of the rebels at the Battle of New Ross. After the battle, and the royalists had regained the town, he fled with his wife and Bagenal Harvey to the Greater Saltee Island, from whence they planned to escape to republican France. They were betrayed under torture by a local farmer, arrested, and brought to Wexford town to…

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1699 – Molly Malone reputedly dies of the fever.

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

The famous song, “Sweet Molly Malone” is a tribute to the memory of a real person who was a fishwife selling cockles and mussels in the streets of Dublin. In popular Dublin parlance, she’s referred to as “The Tart with the Cart and “The Dish with the Fish”.

Molly had wheeled her wheel barrow from the Liberties to the more fashionable Grafton Street, crying ‘Cockles and Mussels’ as she went. At nights another and less admirable Molly appeared, as her chemise, basque and zapotas were replaced by an even more revealing dress, fish-net tights and stilettos. Thus provocatively attired, she sallied forth looking for clients, who tended to include students of Trinity College, a place renowned for its debauchery. Yet, we reflect, in all probability Molly was more sinned against than sinning.

During Dublin’s Millennium in 1988, which was held to celebrate the discovery by historical experts that the city…

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