Remembering Ettie Steinberg, Ireland’s Only Holocaust Victim

Historical Tours Ireland

Auschwitz Concentration Camp

Dublin, Ireland – A memorial dedicated to the only Irish Holocaust victims documented to die in Auschwitz – Ettie Steinberg and her son Leon – was recently unveiled in Ireland’s capital city.

The said memorial was put up to permanently honor the country’s only victims of the Holocaust, the Irish Central reports.

Ettie Steinberg was born one of the seven children of Aaron Hirsh Steinberg and Bertha Roth in what was Czechoslovakia. Sometime in the 1920s, the family moved in to Ireland and settled in Dublin in a tiny house at 28 Raymond Terrace. Etties Steinberg and her siblings all went to St. Catherine’s School.

According to stories, Ettie Steinberg had worked as a seamstress shortly before she got married. Her sister, Fanny Frankel who is now in Toronto, recalled in an interview way back in 2008 how Ettie had such “golden hands” when it came to making clothes. She even kept…

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Woman who appeared in RTÉ documentary investigated for SS link

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Hilde Michnia is suspected of forcing prisoners on an evacuation march in 1945
Hilde Michnia is suspected of forcing prisoners on an evacuation march in 1945

German prosecutors have confirmed they are investigating a 93-year-old woman on suspicion that she served as a Nazi SS guard during World War II, after she appeared in an RTÉ documentary last year.

Hilde Michnia is suspected of forcing prisoners on an evacuation march in 1945 during which about 1,400 women died.

Hamburg prosecutors’ began investigating her last week after a social worker filed charges against her.

Hans-Jürgen Brennecke filed the charges after seeing the RTÉ documentary ‘Close to Evil’ in which Bergen Belsen survivor Tomi Reichental attempted to interview Michnia.

In the documentary, Michnia admitted to taking part in the evacuation.

“She said herself, three times, ‘I was on the death march.’ I thought, hang on, there have to be some consequences if such important information is in (the film),” Mr Brennecke told UK newspaper The Guardian. “When I…

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Two Holocaust survivors, one in Ireland, find they were on the same train to Bergen-Belsen

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Peter Kubicek (left) and Tomi Reichental (right) find each other through the Internet.

Peter Kubicek, an 85-year-old Holocaust survivor living in New York, knows all about the power of coincidence.

Through an amazing series of events he was reunited with Tomi Reichental, an Irish citizen who lives in Dublin and is also a Holocaust survivor from the same village in Slovakia. Reichental, 79, lectures on the Holocaust to Irish schoolchildren.

They both realized they were very likely on the same cattle car that toook them to a notorious concentration camp.

Kubicek’s family was torn apart during WWII as his father failed to secure visas to New York for Peter, his mother and grandmother. His family was split further apart as they were deported to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in October 1944 and Peter was consequently moved between a further five camps before his liberation…

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Ireland’s only Holocaust victim, the Ettie Steinberg story

Historical Tours Ireland

September 15,2015

“The story of the only Irish citizen to die in Auschwitz.” “The story of the only Irish citizen to die in Auschwitz.”Photo by: Wiki

A memorial to the only Irish citizens killed in the Holocaust was unveiled in Dublin earlier this year. The story is fascinating for many reasons. A recently penned article by Conan Kennedy examines the story in depth and re-examines the lives of Ettie Steinberg and her son Leon who are documented as the only Irish to die in Auschwitz.

Beginning in the former Czechoslovakia, Ettie was one of seven children born to Aaron Hirsh Steinberg and Bertha Roth. Sometime during the 1920s the family relocated to the Emerald Isle and settled in Ireland in a small house at, 28 Raymond Terrace, in Dublin. The children all attended St, Catherine’s school, in Donore Avenue.

It is believed that Ettie worked as a seamstress for a time while in Dublin before her marriage…

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The History of the Jews in Ireland

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The History of the Jews of the Republic of Ireland

Irish Jewish Museum
Jews have lived in Ireland for centuries. The earliest reference is in the Annals of Innisfallen in the year 1079 which records the arrival of five Jews from over the sea. It is probable that they came as merchants from Rouen in France.

There is little doubt that following the expulsion of the Jews from Portugal in 1496 that some arrived on the South coast. The honour of having the first Jewish Mayor in Ireland goes to the town of Youghal in Co. Cork, where a Mr. William Annyas was elected to that position in 1555. Since then Mr. Robert Briscoe was Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1956 and 1961, his son Mr. Ben Briscoe was Lord Mayor in 1988, and Mr. Gerald Goldberg was Lord Mayor of Cork in 1977.

The earliest record of a Synagogue in Ireland dates…

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The Jews of Cork

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History of the Cork Hebrew Congregation and the Jews of Cork. 
The first wave of Jewish emigration to Cork was in 1772 with the influx of a small community of Sephardic Jews from Portugal.
Relatively little is known about this first community. Although they didn’t have a synagogue, a burial ground was discovered at Kemp Street, to the back of the present synagogue on number 10, South Terrace.
The community didn’t exceed about 40 in number, and disappeared through intermarriage with local Protestant families.
Written records from 1891 point to the emergence of a second Jewish community in Cork, following the assimilation of the previous Sephardic community. This community, by contrast, were Ashkenazi, coming (mostly) from a town called Yakmyan in Kovno (former White Russia).
It is very unlikely that Cork, Ireland, was the intended destination of these Eastern European émigrés. They had fled persecution (pogroms) in a staunchly Catholic…

View original post 1,308 more words

The Jews of Cork

Historical Tours Ireland

History of the Cork Hebrew Congregation and the Jews of Cork. 
The first wave of Jewish emigration to Cork was in 1772 with the influx of a small community of Sephardic Jews from Portugal.
Relatively little is known about this first community. Although they didn’t have a synagogue, a burial ground was discovered at Kemp Street, to the back of the present synagogue on number 10, South Terrace.
The community didn’t exceed about 40 in number, and disappeared through intermarriage with local Protestant families.
Written records from 1891 point to the emergence of a second Jewish community in Cork, following the assimilation of the previous Sephardic community. This community, by contrast, were Ashkenazi, coming (mostly) from a town called Yakmyan in Kovno (former White Russia).
It is very unlikely that Cork, Ireland, was the intended destination of these Eastern European émigrés. They had fled persecution (pogroms) in a staunchly Catholic…

View original post 1,308 more words