#OTD in 1917 – Louisa Nolan is honoured with the medal for heroism during Easter Week 1916, by King George.

According to the Sinn Féin Rebellion handbook (pg. 259), she tended to ‘wounded officers and men’ during the battle on Mount Street Bridge. ‘Miss Nolan went calmly through a hail of bullets and carried water and other comforts to the wounded men,’ the publication notes. Her story made it across the Atlantic, where a Chicago newspaper dubbed her ‘Ireland’s Bravest Colleen’ on 20 March. She was the daughter of ex-Head Constable Nolan of the Royal Irish Constabulary, who resided at Ringsend.’ As a teenager she was a chorus girl at the Gaiety Theatre.
By Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

According to the Sinn Féin Rebellion handbook (pg. 259), she tended to ‘wounded officers and men’ during the battle on Mount Street Bridge. ‘Miss Nolan went calmly through a hail of bullets and carried water and other comforts to the wounded men,’ the publication notes. Her story made it across the Atlantic, where a Chicago newspaper dubbed her ‘Ireland’s Bravest Colleen’ on 20 March. She was the daughter of ex-Head Constable Nolan of the Royal Irish Constabulary, who resided at Ringsend.’ As a teenager she was a chorus girl at the Gaiety Theatre.

Image |  Miss Louisa Nolan (L) attends an investiture ceremony to receive a Military Medal for her actions during the Easter Rising of 1916.

SaveSave

SaveSave

View original post

#OTD in Irish History – 24 February:

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

1582 – Pope Gregory XIII announces the new Gregorian calendar, replacing the Julian calendar.

1692 – The Treaty of Limerick is ratified by William of Orange.

1721 – Birth of physician and politician, John McKinly, in Ireland (Ulster). He emigrated to Wilmington, Delaware in 1742 and was a veteran of the French and Indian War. McKinly served in the Delaware General Assembly, was the first elected President of Delaware, and for a time was a member of the Federalist Party.

1780 – A British Act opens colonial trade to Irish goods.

1797 – Birth of writer, artist, musician and songwriter, Samuel Lover, in Dublin. Lover produced a number of Irish songs, of which several – including The Angel’s Whisper, Molly Bawn, and The Four-leaved Shamrock – attained great popularity. He also wrote novels, of which Rory O’Moore (in its first form a ballad), and Handy Andy are the best known…

View original post 1,216 more words

Medieval Archaeologists: An Endangered Species?

Dr Ben Jervis

Today I came across this piece in the Times Higher entitled ‘European Universities Fight to Save Rare Subjects?‘. I clicked on it as I was intrigued to know what was considered a rare subject, and was further intrigued when I noticed medieval archaeology on the list. This list actually relates to German institutions and is derived from research undertaken at the Johannes Gutenburg Institute at the University of Mainz.

I didn’t quite know what to make of this – is medieval archaeology really in danger? My experience over the last decade or so has seen it to be in fairly good health. Since 2012 the Medieval Europe conference has been re-invigorated through its inclusion in the annual European Association of Archaeologists Conference. Both the Society for Medieval Archaeology student conference and the Early Medieval Archaeology Student Symposium (EMASS) are going strong. Recently the journal Medieval Archaeology has…

View original post 1,072 more words

ABBEYFEALE HERITAGE TRAIL 2 – ‘The Liberator’ at Leahy’s Inn

West Limerick Heritage

ABBEYFEALE HERITAGE TRAIL

image

DANIEL O’CONNELL
1775 – 1847
LOCATION – THE SQUARE, ABBEYFEALE

A Heritage Plaque identifies the Building formally known as Leahy’s Inn where Daniel O’Connell – “The Liberator” – along with other members of his family was registered numerous times in old Business Records between 1836 and 1842. These accounts relate predominately to the hiring of horses and Drivers for their Carriages on various journeys to and from Dublin and their home in Derrynane in Co Kerry. There are also several letters by Daniel O’Connell and members of his family which were written to the Leahy family in Abbeyfeale informing them several days in advance of their travel arrangements and any requirements they may need when they arrived.

Daniel was a well-known Barrister and later an even more powerful Politician. He is best known for his campaign for “Catholic Emancipation” – the right of Irish Catholics to sit…

View original post 84 more words

Suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington’s West Limerick Connections

West Limerick Heritage

image

Hanna Sheehy Skeffington (1877-1946), one of the founders of the Irish Women’s Franchise League, which advocated for the rights of women to vote in elections in Ireland had strong West Limerick connections. Her father was David Sheehy Tullaha Broadford who was an Irish Parliamentary Party M.P. and her mother was Elizabeth (Betsy) McCoy Curramore House in the parish of Loughill-Ballyhahill. Hanna was born in Kanturk Co Cork.  The family moved to Loughmore near Templemore in North Tipperary and, when her father was elected an M. P., the family moved to Dublin.

image

She married Francis Skeffington, an ardent supporter of women’s rights and a pacifist and they became known as the “Sheehy Skeffingtons”. Hanna was jailed on a number of occasions for her militancy in trying to secure women’s rights.

Recently, her grand daughter Micheline Sheehy Skeffington re-enacted the historic actions of breaking glass at Dublin Castle to mark 100 years…

View original post 90 more words

#OTD in Irish History – 8 February:

Stair na hÉireann/History of Ireland

1601 – Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Queen Elizabeth I – the revolt is quickly crushed. Politically ambitious, and a committed general, he was placed under house arrest following a poor campaign in Ireland during the Nine Years’ War in 1599. In 1601 he led an abortive coup d’état against the government and was executed for treason.

1770 – The Cork Butter Exchange was founded. In early decades of the eighteenth century, butter made in many counties in Munster was being exported through the port of Cork through to an extensive wide network of countries. At that stage it had become one of the most important shipping ports in the world.

1833 – Birth of sculptor, Launt Thompson, in Abbeyleix, Co Laois. Forced to emigrate to the US in 1847, during ‘the Great Hunger’, with his widowed mother, they settled in Albany, New York. There, he found work as…

View original post 1,120 more words

Reporting the House of Lords 1660-1832

The History of Parliament

The latest blog from the Georgian Lords reports back from last month’s conference of the British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies in Oxford, which members of the section attended to speak about the project.

A month has now passed since members of the House of Lords 1715-90 project, in company with Dr Paul Seaward, attended the annual conference of the British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (BSECS) at St Hugh’s College, Oxford. Members of the History had last attended BSECS in 2013 to receive the Society’s Digital Resources award and we were delighted to return to what is always a marvellously busy conference marked by large numbers of parallel sessions covering all manner of subjects pertinent to the world of the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’.

What could be more appropriate, then, as a venue for reporting the progress made into Part Two of the Lords project, which will ultimately produce over…

View original post 884 more words